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Revolutionary War 1776-1781

1780 - Battle of McIntyre's Farm

October 3, 1780 - Dwindling supplies force Lord Cornwallis to send a foraging party out into the Mecklenburg countryside. Three hundred British troops make their way up Beatties Ford Road toward the Hopewell Presbyterian Church. They meet fierce resistance at McIntyre’s Farm from a band of fourteen local men led by Captains Thompson and Knox. The British troops flee back to the safety of Charlotte and the British headquarters at Thomas Polk’s house. (Legette Blythe and Charles Raven Brockman.

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1780 - Cornwallis Departs

October 12, 1780 - The people of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County continue to vex General Cornwallis. Skirmishes such as the Battle of the Bees just nine days earlier have shown the British commander that a military victory won't be easily won. Cornwallis calls this place a Hornet's Nest of rebellion, and leaves.

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1780-10-12

1780 - Nathanael Greene

October 12, 1780 - The people of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County continue to vex General Cornwallis. Skirmishes such as the Battle of the Bees just nine days earlier have shown the British commander that a military victory won't be easily won. Cornwallis calls this place a Hornet's Nest of rebellion, and leaves.

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1780 - King's Mountain

October 7, 1780 - On a long, low ridge to the west of Charlotte, frontiersmen from Georgia, Virginia, and both Carolinas are fighting a band of British militiamen led by Major Patrick Ferguson. Although they are evenly matched with about 900 men each, the determined Americans surround the British and trap them at the top of Kings Mountain. Twenty-eight Americans lose their lives and 68 suffer injuries, but they kill, wound or capture nearly all of the British troops in a stunning victory that helps bring about the end of the Revolutionary War.

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1781 - Guilford Courthouse

March 15, 1781 - Four thousand American soldiers meet half that number of British at the Battle of Guilford Courthouse, near Greensboro. Three hours later when the fighting stops, neither side can claim victory. But this battle helps convince Britain's General Cornwallis to abandon the Carolinas.

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1781 - Cowan's Ford

February 1, 1781 - British commander Cornwallis advances back into North Carolina as American General Nathanael Greene's army retreats. At a crossing place, or ford, on the Catawba River, the Battle of Cowan's Ford claims the life of beloved North Carolina militia commander General William Lee Davidson. In later years, a town, a county and a college will be named for Davidson.

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1781 - Articles of Confederation

All thirteen states ratify the Articles of Confederation which calls for a firm league of friendship between states. However, each state remains sovereign and independent. Congress continues to manage foreign affairs, determine currency, regulate the postal services and other services, but they could not regulate commerce or raise money or enlist troops directly. Eventually serious problems arise.

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1781 - Beginning of the End

Dozens more battles have been fought throughout the Carolinas, Georgia and Virginia. But the British have made a serious mistake. They have assumed that Southerners who are still loyal to the Crown will help them easily defeat the American army. Their strategy fails as the South continues to fight for independence.

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1781 - Serving Her Country

November 1781 - The British have allowed American nurses to care for wounded American prisoners, so Elizabeth Jackson travels to Charleston, South Carolina. Andrew Jackson is only 14 years old when he receives a small bundle from Charleston. The package contains his mother's belongings. Elizabeth Jackson has contracted the plague and died while caring for her country's fighting men.

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1776 - Common Sense

January, 1776 - Even among the delegates to the Continental Congress, there are disagreements. Some men, called Loyalists, still want to remain faithful to Britain. Others, including North Carolinians, demand complete independence. The turning point comes when Thomas Paine writes a pamphlet entitled Common Sense. His strong words convince the colonies to cut all ties with Britain. Finally, there is solid support for Independence.

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